Speaker For Nursing World Conference 2019

Title: Prayer Circles and the Perception of Work Environment

Emily Cannon

Indiana State University, USA

Biography

Emily Cannon is a native of Terre Haute, Indiana. Emily received her Associate of Science in Nursing from Vincennes University in 1995. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and a Master’s in Nursing from Indiana Wesleyan University. She graduated in May of 2015 from Indiana State University’s Doctorate of Nursing Practice program.
Emily worked for Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana as a medical-surgical float nurse (1995-1997) and later as an Infection Control Practitioner (1997-2003). From 2003-2012, she served as a nursing faculty member at Ivy Tech Community College until she began teaching in the Baccalaureate Nursing Program for Indiana State University.
Emily’s interests include teaching, infection prevention and treatment, emergency nursing, and community health. She enjoys spending time with her family, running, and is an advocate for animals, children, and the elderly.

Abstract

Purpose: Spiritual care for healthcare providers has been vital for stress reduction and cohesiveness among professionals. Following an oncology patient’s difficult death in the fall of 2016, a small group of healthcare members decided to meet for a brief group prayer prior to the start of the day shift. The group prayer gathering continued as attendees wanted to continue this brief morning prayer. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to identify how group prayer may have influenced healthcare workers’ perceptions regarding the work environment.

Methods: A convenience sample of 27 healthcare team members took part in the project over a 1-month period. The data was gathered with a 10-item questionnaire, voluntarily completed after the experience. The information was reviewed and analyzed by the research team. This study was approved by an associated university’s institutional review board and the hospital review board.

Results: Significant findings emerged regarding the positive psychological and emotional experiences of those who participated in the project. Data also indicated that the timing of the group prayer was important.

Conclusion: Prayer is a valuable tool for healthcare team members as a part of self-care. It may contribute to better employee relationships, cohesive working groups, and enhanced patient care.